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Our recent Europe trip didn't stop in Prague. We stopped in Vienna on our way back home, and while I already did an extensive 6-part travel series to Vienna, in this post I want to share a place in the city that I hadn't visited previously. It's the park called "Prater". 

The Prater is a large public park in Vienna's 2nd district Leopoldstadt. The Wurstelprater amusement park, often simply called "Prater", stands in one corner of the Wiener Prater and includes the Wiener Riesenrad.

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We also had the chance to see out friend Mirna, who lives in Vienna. She took us to the Prater. In the image below, we are waiting for the Metro to get to Leopoldstadt.

Our stay in Prague has come to an end. And for the finale, I want to show you a nightly stroll through the city, and the magical sights it has to offer. When the night sets over Prague, the city transforms into a new place. I hope you will enjoy our leisurely stroll through the city as well as the last part of the travel series.

This is a multi-part travel series. Other parts include:
Part One: Old Town Square
Part Two: Jewish Quarter and the river Vltava
Part Three: Prague Castle and Gardens
Part Four: Charles Bridge and Little Quarter
Part Five: A Night in Prague

click on the images for a bigger view


We are finishing visiting the four major districts of Prague in today's post, which will further explore the Little Quarter in which you will also find the Charles Bridge, one of the more prominent sights from Prague. This is a part of the city that has hardly any new buildings since the 18th century. It was founded in 1257 and built on the slopes below the Castle Hill with magnificent views across the river to the Old Town. 

This is a multi-part travel series. Other parts include:
Part One: Old Town Square
Part Two: Jewish Quarter and the river Vltava
Part Three: Prague Castle and Gardens
Part Four: Charles Bridge and Little Quarter
Part Five: A Night in Prague

click on the images for a bigger view

The day started out early as we departed with the metro to the Malostranske namesti station, which brings you to the Little Quarter district. There were many people out already and since this is a very popular part of the city, be prepared for crowds. But there are also many little corners here, in which you can find rest from the busy streets.

Our exploration of Prague continues in this third part, where we move up hill towards the Prague Castle. The history of the city begins with the Castle which was founded in the 9th Century. The buildings enclosed by the Castle walls include a palace, three churches and a monastery. Then in 1320 a town called Hradcany was founded in the a part of the Castle's outer perimeter. Since 1918 it has been the seat of the president of the Republic.

This is a multi-part travel series. Other parts include:
Part One: Old Town Square
Part Two: Jewish Quarter and the river Vltava
Part Three: Prague Castle and Gardens
Part Four: Charles Bridge and Little Quarter
Part Five: A Night in Prague

click on the images for a bigger view

As our journey through Prague continues, we move on to a different city district: Josefov or the Jewish Quarter. While stepping out of the old town, you can immediately notice the change. The buildings in this part of the city look brand-new, there are many high-end shops and boutiques to be found here as well as expensive cars parked along the streets. But this part of Prague has a different side as well. You can find various historic places of interest here, that will shed some light on the life of the Jewish community here, throughout the ages.

But in this part I will also show you some sights from the river Vltava, that I captured on our way out of the Jewish Quarter and into another district of the city.

This is a multi-part travel series. Other parts include:
Part One: Old Town Square
Part Two: Jewish Quarter and the river Vltava
Part Three: Prague Castle and Gardens
Part Four: Charles Bridge and Little Quarter
Part Five: A Night in Prague

click on the images for a bigger view


Jews in Prague

Looking at the city now it seems impossible to imagine that these parts of the city were a dooming health hazard back in the 19th century. Jews were marked back then, with yellow circles on their clothes and were pushed to live in this little part of Prague, which quickly became their ghetto. Inside the ghetto the Jewish people had their own town hall. The Jews even had permission to fly their own flag. Jewish living in the ghetto prospered in many diverse professions such as mathematicians, astronomers, geographers, historians, philosophers and artists. So there was persecution as well as periods of renaissance.


Roaming the Streets of the Jewish Quarter

As you will quickly gleam from the first couple of images, the streets and buildings in this district are pristine and there is so much grand architecture to be seen. The colors of the buildings are held in pastel and beige tones, and that carries throughout it. I love the sidewalks, which are meticulously designed and arranged with dark and light cobble stones.




The Old New Synagogue

Next up you will see the Old New Synagogue. It dates back to the year 1270 and is the oldest synagogue in Europe. The synagogue was originally called the New or Great Synagogue and later, when newer synagogues were built in the 16th century, it became known as the Old-New Synagogue



The Old Jewish Cemetery

This upcoming sight is located only a short walk from the aforementioned synagogue. It's a curious place, as you will see many headstones crammed next to each other. As I mentioned earlier, the Jewish community was persecuted at times here, and this a result of one of those times. Jewish people were only allowed to be buried here, and once the place filled up, the bodies were stacked one on top of the other, sometimes having as much as 12 layers. As you walk inside of it, you will definitely feel goosebumps.



Moving out to the river Vltava

As the day progressed, it was time to walk out towards the river Vltava, which flows through Prague. Walking past the Czech Philharmonic (image above) as well as the Rudolfinum, which is a very prominent music auditorium and art gallery, we stepped onto the Jan Palach Square to get closer to the river bank. This is a busy part of the city, and it's a point where three districts collide with each other. 



There is however a stillness here as well. This little square is a bit off from tourist attractions, and for me those places are always better, since you get to see the real life of a city. The Manes Bridge (named after Josef Manes, a Czech painter, whose statue you can see in the next image) is right next to the square, and on this day it would take as further into our exploration of Prgaue. But before we crossed it was time to take a look at the river.


The river Vltava

The Vltava is the longest river within the Czech Republic, running southeast along the Bohemian Forest and then north across Bohemia, through the cities Cesky Krumlov, Ceske Budejovice and Prague, and finally merging with the river Elbe. It is commonly referred to as the Czech national river.



From this place at the river bank you can gaze at the beauty of the buildings and sights that are located along the river stream.


In this next shot you can see the Prague Castle District as well as the castle itself on top of the little hill. This would be our next stop. On the left hand side you can see the Manus Bridge, which we used to cross the river.




There are benches here to sit on and look out onto the river, as well as a little cafe (Manes Cafe) where you can get something to drink. For food you will find the Italian restaurant Grosseto, which has salads, meats, fish and of course pasta and pizzas.




Views from the Vltava River

There is so much beauty to be seen from the Manus Bridge, much more in fact then from the better known and more visited Charles Bridge (which you can see in the image below). This is just my personal opinion and here is why: first this is a traffic bridge, and not crowded by swarms of tourists like the Charles Bridge, second, you can actually get a great shot of the Charles Bridge from here, which you are not able to do otherwise, and third, besides the Chrales Bridge, the Manus Bridge gives you excellent views of the Prague Castle District as well as other parts of the northern part of Prague.


Of course you have to visit the Charles Bridge (no trip to Prague would be complete without it), but don't limit yourself when exploiting. Just a little change of perspective can give you so much more then any tourist guide can.



Trams frequent the Manus Bridge, and while we didn't take a tram this day, we would later on. The city is well connected, and you can get to most of the places via tram and metro.



We finally crossed the bridge and ventured out into the next district of Prague: The Prague Castle. What we saw there will be in the third part of this travel series.


End of Part Two
To be continued...

Prague is a strange combination of many worlds. Parts of it are Gothic and grim, others modern and vibrant while others have a classic historic charm. I had the fortune to spend a couple of days recently here, and in this travel series, I hope to show you the various facets this city has to offer. Even though we stayed in Prague for only four days, we managed to see most of it. The city is big, but the sights are close by and you can see pretty much all of them in a short amount of time. So let's get started...


This is a multi-part travel series. Other parts include:
Part One: Old Town Square
Part Two: Jewish Quarter and the river Vltava
Part Three: Prague Castle and Gardens
Part Four: Charles Bridge and Little Quarter
Part Five: A Night in Prague


Our 5 day trip to Prague has ended, and I am now back home, trying to sync up with old routines. Monday brings with it a new work week, and there is a lot of catching up to do.


There are so many images that we took in Prague, that I will need at least two days to sort through them, but I hope to have the first part ready by Wednesday. Until then, here are some more images taken with my phone camera.

* The Travel Series is up now. View it here *

As I am writing this, my sister Jasmina, my friend Selma and I are visiting Prague in the Czech Republic. We arrived here on Wednesay and are staying a couple more days. Until I return home I wanted to show you some On Location images from Prague that I have made with our several mobile devices that have cameras. Of course the full blown travel series waits for you as soon as I come home and edit what I have shot with my Canon 6D.



As our day in the nature around the river Neretva came to an end, we made our way to the shores of the river. After a short walk, you can reach a hidden path, that takes you through the underbrush, and directly to the beach. The water was very high on this day, and not much of the shore was left to stand on, but we did manage to make our way down and enjoy the sights.

This is a two-part photo series. Other parts include
Part One: A Walk in the Woods
Part Two: On the River Shore

click on the images for a bigger view


May 1st was Labor Day here in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and I think in a lot of other countries as well. Traditionally people venture out into nature with friends and family and grill, and it was no different for me on that day. We had a family gathering in a barely populated village called Moruga next to the river Neretva in southern Bosnia and Herzegovina. After lunch we went out for a walk. Nature here is in full bloom and I think I got some really good shots, which I will show you in two parts.

This is a two-part photo series. Other parts include
Part One: A Walk in the Woods
Part Two: On the River Shore

click on the images for a bigger view